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How has SL affected you POSITIVELY in RL?


JPG0809
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Sup!Sup! \(^ o ^)/

So, usually I see SL shown in a kinda-ish bad light.

It seems people find pointing out the flaws more enjoyable rather than noticing postives which isn't for EVERYONE but, I've seen a trend.

If you look up certain documentaries, articles, and other pages through Google/Youtube, a majority of how SL is portayed is mostly with negative views showing how it can lead only through addiction, marriage problems, anti-social behavior, etc.

Obviously, these statements may or may not be true depending on the person and usually the negative stuff sells.

What really suprises me is that many people actually know what SL is from gamers to non-gamers and usually when a friend/family member/relative sees me while I'm on, I'm usually greeted with a response of "Is that the game where you can make money/have sex?" or "I seen that on the news, some weird things going on there." or along those lines.

I would like to know from mostly the normies and not really the more strategic/talented/skilled users(but you are free to :) )

In what way has SL affected you life personally? It can be physically, emotinally, mentally, your view on RL, whatever. Also, do you think the reputation of SL keeps newbies from joining or has a part in it?

 

Thank you for reading and I look foward to your responses!

 

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You cannot call a game and everyone who play it "bad" just because there are some suggestive things in the game that you can do. Not everyone (or anywhere close) who plays Second Life just runs around and has virtual sex. Sure there are those who do that (no hate at all), but it is rather ignorant to call a game bad because of the choices that only some users make. There is so much more potential to Second Life than just the sex, relationships and money.

 

I'd say it has affected me positively because I just come on here and have a good time, and leave it at that.

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The strategic/talented/skilled selections look like the most fun, I want to be one of those. I'm not normal.

My typing and grammar have improved.

Meeting chatting and befriending Residents from Poland, France, Germany, Switzerland, Canada, Australia and several other Nations, has helped to prove that  we live a small World. We are more alike than we are not.

Emotionally:  What do you tell a SL with two black eyes? Nothing, it has already been told twice.

We have a reputation? I joined a long time ago. I had never heard of SL prior to that. I'm vanilla on many things.

I think I understand the problem. There is a good you tube video that may help to explain why a creative person might not tell his WoW buddies that he has a SL account.

 

 

 

 

 

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There is so much more potential to Second Life than just the sex, relationships and money."

 


Without those three, let alone losing even one of them, SL would be a barren wasteland instead of merely  being a wasteland.

But that is the essence of the virtual isn't it. Nothing is really there.

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I started in SL knowing ZERO about 3D building and programming.  After about 3 years of building in SL I was able to use those skills to get a RL full time 3D design job,  unfortunately that company went out of business.  In SL I'm lucky to make 20$ a week, so I just look at SL as a fun way to learn new skills.

The other big impact SL has had on my RL life it that it saves me lots of $ in RL.  I buy or make what I want in SL, and buy only what I need in RL. 

To avoid spending too much time working in SL I like to research what ever I'm building in RL.   I've ended up on the beach swimming with sea lions or riding an old steam trains because of SL projects.

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JPG0809 wrote:

Sup!Sup! \(^ o ^)/

So, usually I see SL shown in a kinda-ish bad light.

It seems people find pointing out the flaws more enjoyable rather than noticing postives which isn't for EVERYONE but, I've seen a trend.

If you look up certain documentaries, articles, and other pages through Google/Youtube, a majority of how SL is portayed is mostly with negative views showing how it can lead only through addiction, marriage problems, anti-social behavior, etc.

Obviously, these statements may or may not be true depending on the person and usually the negative stuff sells.

What really suprises me is that many people actually know what SL is from gamers to non-gamers and usually when a friend/family member/relative sees me while I'm on, I'm usually greeted with a response of "Is that the game where you can make money/have sex?" or "I seen that on the news, some weird things going on there." or along those lines.

I would like to know from mostly the normies and not really the more strategic/talented/skilled users(but you are free to
:)
)

In what way has SL affected you life personally? It can be physically, emotinally, mentally, your view on RL, whatever. Also, do you think the reputation of SL keeps newbies from joining or has a part in it?

 

Thank you for reading and I look foward to your responses!

 

 

****

My stalking abilities have improved (!)

****

I've learned a lot about computers, how to use them, and about the people who use them and think they know all about them (a lot of BS flies about), whereas prior to me being in SL I tried to avoid contact with technology pretty much.

****

I've discovered that I definitely am not a lesbian.

****

****

No one I've spoken to out in my real life has even heard of Second Life, even now, after all these years, so this thing about it having a reputation is perhaps only valid in certain parts of the country/world.

 

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To name a few in no particular order

  • It's nurtured my creativity and been intellectually stimulating
  • I've learned a ton of stuff
  • It's allowed me to do things that I can't do in RL
  • I've met people from all over the world that I never would have met otherwise and formed friendships with them
  • I've broaden my horizons by learning the points of view of other people from other places in the world
  • It was a life line for me during a period of my life when I was fighting a serious and very painful illness and confined to bed.  It gave me a social outlet and being in world and 'normal' made me forget my illness temporarily.

 

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Marigold Devin wrote:

****

My stalking abilities have improved (!)

****

I've learned a lot about computers, how to use them, and about the people who use them and think they know all about them (a lot of BS flies about), whereas prior to me being in SL I tried to avoid contact with technology pretty much.

****

I've discovered that I definitely am not a lesbian.

****

****

No one I've spoken to out in my real life has even heard of Second Life, even now, after all these years, so this thing about it having a reputation is perhaps only valid in certain parts of the country/world.

 

**** Marigold, I reckon you owe me 50L$ in ******* royalties for the use of one of my ******* memes!

**********Rudi**********

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Marigold Devin wrote:

 

No one I've spoken to out in my real life has even heard of Second Life, even now, after all these years, so this thing about it having a reputation is perhaps only valid in certain parts of the country/world.

 

Same here.  When I've mentioned SL to anyone in RL I am either asked "What is SL?" or get a blank stare.  If someone seems  interested I tell them a bit about it and some of the things I enjoy in SL, such as dancing.  The next comment is usually, "That seems weird."

When I've mentioned SL to friends in EQ or WoW I either get, "What is SL?" or "I tried that game once and didn't like it."

Demographically I live in the U.S.; most of the RL people to whom I have mentioned SL are 45+ and only use PCs (generally laptops) for research, email, FB or Twitter.  Most have never done any kind of PC gaming.  The people I know in MMORPGs are generally fairly hard-core gamers, also 40+, and prefer games where they level up and get "ubar powers and phat lootz" so SL wouldn't be their cup of tea.  A couple of years ago I finally convinced one of my friends from EQ to try SL.  When I asked what his name meant (it was a mess of letters) he said, "You can see that?!?!  That's my pw!!!  What kind of a game shows other people your pw????"  It took a long time to settle him down long enough to figure out that somehow in the signup process he put his pw where his name should be.  He then said that the instructions said not to worry about a name as he could create one once he got in world.  I actually went through the signup process to double check this and it was a bit confusing.  Maybe it has changed since then. Otoh, maybe the names with weird combos of letters & numbers *are* actually passwords...hmmmmm.  My friend decided from that experience that he wanted nothing to do with SL.

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For me it was the intermediate step to computer 3D modeling made available with prims.  Had lots of fun stacking and torturing prims, it's like Legos on steroids, and have gradually ventured into 3D modeling apps.  If before SL I had taken a look at something like Blender my mind would have gone poof.

As far as debunking the more common and uninformed opinions of SL I gave up long ago, when I tried explaining to friends and family and whoever what SL really is I just got that look.  So now when declining some RL thing they try to drag me off to I just tell them I'd rather do internet porn.

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RudolphFarquhar wrote:


Marigold Devin wrote:

****

My stalking abilities have improved (!)

****

I've learned a lot about computers, how to use them, and about the people who use them and think they know all about them (a lot of BS flies about), whereas prior to me being in SL I tried to avoid contact with technology pretty much.

****

I've discovered that I definitely am not a lesbian.

****

****

No one I've spoken to out in my real life has even heard of Second Life, even now, after all these years, so this thing about it having a reputation is perhaps only valid in certain parts of the country/world.

 

**** Marigold, I reckon you owe me 50L$ in ******* royalties for the use of one of my ******* memes!

**********Rudi**********

**** or perhaps it is you, Rudi, who owes me 50L$, to pay for the therapy to undo the damage caused by your incessant overuse of the ****, which has subliminally placed itself into my psyche?! :matte-motes-big-grin-wink:

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Czari Zenovka wrote:


Marigold Devin wrote:

 

No one I've spoken to out in my real life has even heard of Second Life, even now, after all these years, so this thing about it having a reputation is perhaps only valid in certain parts of the country/world.

 

Same here.  When I've mentioned SL to anyone in RL I am either asked "What is SL?" or get a blank stare.  If someone seems  interested I tell them a bit about it and some of the things I enjoy in SL, such as dancing.  The next comment is usually, "That seems weird."

When I've mentioned SL to friends in EQ or WoW I either get, "What is SL?" or "I tried that game once and didn't like it."

Demographically I live in the U.S.; most of the RL people to whom I have mentioned SL are 45+ and only use PCs (generally laptops) for research, email, FB or Twitter.  Most have never done any kind of PC gaming.  The people I know in MMORPGs are generally fairly hard-core gamers, also 40+, and prefer games where they level up and get "ubar powers and phat lootz" so SL wouldn't be their cup of tea.  A couple of years ago I finally convinced one of my friends from EQ to try SL.  When I asked what his name meant (it was a mess of letters) he said, "You can see that?!?!  That's my pw!!!  What kind of a game shows other people your pw????"  It took a long time to settle him down long enough to figure out that somehow in the signup process he put his pw where his name should be.  He then said that the instructions said not to worry about a name as he could create one once he got in world.  I actually went through the signup process to double check this and it
was
a bit confusing.  Maybe it has changed since then. Otoh, maybe the names with weird combos of letters & numbers *are* actually passwords...hmmmmm.  My friend decided from that experience that he wanted nothing to do with SL.

I've brought two real life friends into Second Life, both of whom thought it was weird and complex and very time consuming. One of these said friends has gone back to following local prog rock bands out in real life (I don't hold that against him), and the other friend has been utilising her spare time to try several quick rich schemes for the past five or so years. She hasn't yet realised that she'll have to shift a heck of a lot of home made jam and knitted dolls to make her first million (and making jam and knitting dolls of course is not weird or complex but is most definitely very time consuming).

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I guess for me it's been more of a therapeutic tool than anything. I have rather severe schizophrenia, and before I was on medications I had no life honestly. I spend the greater part of my 14 - 24 years in and out of either hospital, doctors office, or psychiatrist. I play rp SL as a teen, and it's allowed me to 'relive' a lot of moments and expierences from my past that my disease has forced me to miss out on since I've started on mediction. It has allowed me to investigate parts of my personality that didn't have a chance to develop through 'normal' means. 

Also I've used it for 'expirimental' treatment that I couldn't afford other ways. I can create an avatar to match one of my hallucinations, interact with it, and I notice much less severe symptoms each time that hallucination shows up(this was before starting medicatios on my previous avatar). They are doing this in labs with really complex and expensive equipment. I was able to do this for free with the help of some friends. SL has many benefits. 

It's also let me meet tons of people from around the world whom I would have never had a chance to meet any other way; and like many others in this thread it's got me intersted in 3d modeling, scripting, and programming. As far as the stigma I've gotten that, but I tend to hang out with people in their early to mid 20's so they tend to be a bit more educated on the 'digital world'. They think the game is weird that's for sure. It does seem that weird or strange is the typical response to SL from non-players. Confusing is the response from those who have tried it. 

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In 2009 a close friend in SL gave me the courage to do what I needed to do to get my life in order.  I will forever be grateful for that.

More trivially, my Photoshop skills have increased exponentially and I am also much more conscious of my own personal style (clothing and appearance-wise) than I was before SL.

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