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what is a UUID


ZabrinaJean
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Hello Zabrina.

Here I copy from the official page of SL

UUID is an abbreviation for Universally Unique Identifier. It is a 128-bit (16 byte) value which is generated in such a way as to make collisions very unlikely. They are often represented as a string of 32 hex characters with four dashes interspersed. See Wikipedia on UUIDs for more information.

In LSL they are stored in the key variable type (which is a specialized form of a string).

 

Here you can read all about it --> http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/UUID

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Hello Zabrina.

Here I copy from the official page of SL

UUID is an abbreviation for Universally Unique Identifier. It is a 128-bit (16 byte) value which is generated in such a way as to make collisions very unlikely. They are often represented as a string of 32 hex characters with four dashes interspersed. See Wikipedia on UUIDs for more information.

In LSL they are stored in the key variable type (which is a specialized form of a string).

 

Here you can read all about it --> http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/UUID

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Everything in Second Life -- including avatars -- has a UUID, as beethros explains.

Normally, UUIDs are of interest only to scripters (if you are a scripter, then UUIDs are very important indeed), though some security systems ask you to enter avatars'  UUIDs  on notecards, to give them access.

Avatars, sounds and textures have permanent UUIDs, which scripts can use (if I know the UUID of a sound or texture, I can use that sound or texture without having to put a copy of it in my object).   Animations also have permanent UUIDs, but I can't play animations by using them (I can stop animations by using the UUID, though).

Notecards have UUIDs which change every time you edit them.  Scripts can read notecards from their UUIDs (the actual notecard doesn't need to be there in the prim) but this means you have to change the hardcoded UUID in the script if you ever edit the notecard.

Objects (even no-copy ones) change their UUID each time they are rezzed in-world, which means scripters normally have to grab their UUIDs at run-time to use them.

 

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